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. then we look at the three-year tax return and that statement. we do a lot of home care and mom-and-pop shops. we also do start ups. we asked for approval through documents. we work a lot with people who do not know how to file taxes properly. we are mainly focused in san francisco. we are small. we focus mainly on the tenderloin, chinatown, bayview, visitation. we do a lot of expansion. people start small through the credit union and then want to go to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see consistent income coming in. so far, a credit union
by the state was a potential death now for the housing and our taxes stopped the growth of our economy. we in this room and many of us working together took on the story changes for our city some of which have vexed for years >> years. i'm proud that together we through innovation and we foerjd our way ahead. to the city commissioners and to the department heads and to our friends in the business, labor you think non-profit and other communities who spent countless hours with us in negotiations and to the great people of san francisco who rewarded us with your support at ballet in san francisco thank you, very much. together we're putting san francisco back on the right track and building a solid foundation for all our residents. my fellow san francisco's we're living in a time of astonishing innovation and unlimited process we're driving that innovation and for or against the future right here right now not just for san francisco but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world w
paying. they paid a tax shillings to the pound. another indicate the tax is paid and another indicate the taxes in arrears. james lacy was paid in full and not in a rears. the tax in 1846 was cut in half from the previous year. the year 1847 shows something else. the people were taxed in may of 1847 and made to pay a 4 fold increase and in october of 1847, 15 times what they were paying in 1846. this amounted to a 900 percent increase in tax in less than a year. still james lacy was paid in full and not in arrears. i show the book to the librarian who knows i am reading papers to look for clearance notices and says, there's your answer now you know why they left. newspaper mentioned the establishment of insolvant commission. in commission states the tax afforded the clearance amongers the most effective means of getting rid of this agricultural population. some landlords were praised as humane for forgiving 3-4 year's rent or accepting what people could pay. these landlords were in the minority and the landlord of cottage where nie family lived was not among them. rate payer books for
. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations, we have a workshop coming up. that is helpful for those of you who are looking to access the committee on a durable basis. >> also, on behalf of leader pelosi, i want to thank our panel and her staff. we are tenants in this building. i apologize for the security situation that happened upstairs. if you have concerns about it, please come and see me. i would like to convey those to the landlord here so that it does not happen again. thank you. >> hi, everybody. my name is carmen chu. why don't we get started. with a marking up with the department of small business -- we have been working with the department of small business. this project started when we heard from neighborhood merchants. unfortunately, they had access issues, visibility access issues. we have been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of bo
in the last congress when later closing was speaker of the house. she had had 16 tax cuts signed into law to help small businesses grow and thrive. as we know, during the last 15 years, small businesses account for about 2/3 of the job growth in our country, but when the bush recession hits in 2009, 2010, small businesses were hit particularly hard. small businesses are the center of her agenda. congress under her leadership gave 27 million small businesses tax cuts. two main pieces of legislation -- the small businesses jobs act in the information you have, will create a total of 500,000 jobs and create eight tax cuts. they are all described in the packet you have. also, unleashing up to $300 billion in credit for small businesses to access. there are another eight tax cuts that were passed through a number of different laws. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart
go about securing funding for the various graffiti programs? do you use grants, tax assessments, et cetera? anybody? >> i think i can take that. >> okay, ready. >> for anyone who didn't attend my session, i do a juvenile program where i take kids who have been convicted of graffiti crimes to do community service on saturdays. the way i do this is get a public grant from department of public works where we take kids out to graffiti hot spots, we paint over graffiti and they get a reduced fine and credit for probation officers. this is done through a public grant. it's a very effective program. we have been able to turn a lot of kids around, restore justice. we get a lot of positive feedback from the community, a lot of other officers are happy to get the overtime. and as an officer, you're really able to facilitate the program well because you are able to put on a lot of different hats, communicate with probation, you communicate with traffic court judges, with community referral center, and with station personnel. so, you really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the prog
in funds that were originally estimated for phase 1 budget from tax revenue and the sftca won't be available for phase 1 construction. the other revenue sources that we've identified as potential funding strategy for the adjustment in the phase budget would be to increase the loan amount. we are beginning the dialogue with it to make those adjustments. that potentially could result in as much as $97 million in additional revenue to the program. sales tax that the programmed out in future years to phase 1, that would result in about $15 million in phase 1 funding. we have a pending grant through the one bay area grant program to fund pedestrian area for bikes just over $10 million and we are ranked highly in that process and expect to hear something later in this spring with the success of that grant. also potentially accelerating grants from phase 2, likely through a no interest loan from one of our partners. the phase the can't be developed until actual phase 1. because of the restrictions of the use of land sale revenues, we are looking at this to construct only a relative
tax on high earners and why should they come herein instead of somewhere else? >>> first of all, the pressure of our locally grown skeet successful equips are growing and if they can grow within the bay area and so, i'm alms -- between san francisco and oakland, that you believe [inaudible] employee and is i had you raise your hands already and you are going to expand the idea that meet leading edge companies say they want to be with the talented and with oakland being the liberator and home of the -- technology in general and thriving arts and cutting edge innovation in general in areas we really have the talent here in the bay area and i think that is critical and also, i think we are looking at investors internationally and frankly at an -- promising a lot of our time to chinese investors and really an international economy but we are looking at not just across the country but to invest and -- in the bay area and it's not goal of -- 50% there and to ed we are a region and many of these companys are going to be make this horizontal and vertical -- chinese investors in the enti
over 200,000 rides in the san francisco bay area. mobile innovations directly improve the tax experience in san francisco by being able to hail a cab through a smart phone, establish system, investing record sum of money over 200 million to improve local taxi service; the private market is working with great velocity. -- quite frankly we believe that city managed ehailing efforts will kill taxi innovation in san francisco. it one of the competitors rolled out a new feature would could concentrate new resources to bring that feature to market. since features are not defensible and supply would be controlled the only path to profitability for companies like taxi magic is price competition; overtimes eroded by the player who can afford to-- the sfmta can improve the taxi market by placing more caps on the street, working with existing technology providers. >> thank you. >> (calling names) >> good afternoon. >> also it's not going to be relevant to the subject, i thought we would be discussing the issue of having electronic weigh bills which is finished and done with, i want to ex
of taxes. not so many people have a car. copenhagen is like new york, i guess, people do not need cars as much. many people want to commute into the center from the suburbs. that is what we want to prevent. that is why we have such high costs, high taxes on parking your car. the closer that you get to the center, the more expensive. but there is a limit how much we can turn away. that is why we also want to have some systems. i think if we're going to read 50% share of cycling for commuting, it is not enough to offer a good infrastructure. you also need possibly a toll road where people pay for driving and the city. -- for driving into the city. >> i can tell you what it costs in amsterdam. amsterdam is the most expensive place to park your car. it is now 5 euros, nearly $7 per hour, 24 hours per day. also, the question from andy, about 12 years ago, we had a referendum, what to do with the cars in the city. the majority voted for less cars in the city. the last 10 years, the amount of cars went down. it is down 20%, and that was done by making the profiles of the roads a little bit sm
? this is the fifth time. we pay our taxes. >> yes, ma'am. you see, this is a bad situation. when private property is vandalized innocent people are stuck with the expense of fixing it and when public property is fixed, tax dollars are spent cleaning it up instead of providing other services to the public. you want to know who's doing it? >> yes. >> (music). >> hey, check this out. i think that's ed. >> what you got? let me see. that you? >> what have you got? >> no way, man. >> no way, man. >> don't nobody believe you. if you are x, prove it. >> hey, sure looks like it to me . >> oh, man, he's x >> let me see. well, well, well, can this be true. little danny plimpton is the infamous x how can they be, danny boy? why x, you trying to be malcolm x or dmx or racer x or something. >> my first name is xavier daniel plimpton. >> how did you get to the walking bridge on i-5. >> and the fire station over on 14th, how did you get all the way up there. >> didn't i tell y'all? spiderman is my cousin. >> man, i don't believe you. >> so the infamous x, serious, i don't know x, i seen that tag before. se
and terrorists corruption and -- >> excuse me: >> the current situation calls for new taxes and medallion demand and supply created this business. the evolvement -- san francisco minimum wage and inexperienced drivers are hurting the cities respect ability the city as lost the america's can cup share of the anticipated refer revenue. there is an event tonight. the airport and streets are not able to afford and maintain a lot of what government and employees want for the city the investment isn't there the milking is tell your constituents to pay for the luxuries taxi cabs are a luxury as evidence by demand. if everyone made as much as 10 years ago the story would be very different. the real pig here is real estate that most people cannot afford. the oldest bakery in paris -- now they are no longer open. keep the city respectable and the gem that it is and magnificent applause. >> thank you. my name is mic -- you have spoken already? >> yes. >> the rules of the city of san francisco thank you very much. next speaker please come forward? >> my name is stewart -- i am a driver and an owner.
we pay every penny to the city in tax and you know our apartments expense active. i can't even have coffee in my car. the government is telling me so for me i'm on my way to hawaii in january january i'm not going to be -- i can't raise my son in this city. for you guys maybe yes. it can be a very good city. for us it's over if this continues. applause. so i'm on my way to paradise thank you very much. >> thank you, sir next speaker please? >> hi my name is brad -- i'm a driver and dispatcher i've seen for a long time i understand their appears to be a demand for more taxis i think the market maybe instead ly growing we've got new businesses coming in i understand that but what i ask you to do to stop us all from bleeding to death. maybe one or 2 hundred medallions at a time 500 could be a blow to our gut. if we're all going to be making less than minimum wage what kind of people are you going to have driving the taxis i don't think it's going to serve the city. that's a win-win the city will win the drivers will be a much slower bleed the market will hopefully continue to
-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
of the tax that weighs on consumer spending in the first couple of quarters inflation is more or less in line with the fed's target rate of roughly two% and i i think we do a farrell decedent job with our forecast and you can tabling me into talking about upside or down side risk here with you there is one line federal funds target rate and i feel confidant about our forecast for that line because the federal reserve is told that is where they are going to keep the short term interest rates between now and 2014 and if you are looking at the ten year rate and wondering when can i expect to put money in a cd or short-term savings account and expect a normal rate of return, unfortunately probably not at anytime in our 44 cast period and if you look at the treasury it closed at one 99 and two% for the last couple of most and is for the next two years it doesn't get above 2.6% and so what we are really saying there is if you look at united states treasuries right now the two biggest buyer of threshys are the united states reserve and they are going to continue to buy treasuries to continue to driv
at the transportation system in our city with pay role tax reform. in a nutshell we got all the leaders together in our city and agreed to make a difference. i say let's take that same approach with our transportation challenges too. we already have a lot of plans and reports that all driveway solutions were we need to more than news to better match up with the 21 accounting century where people work and shop. and so we'll have a transportation 200 thirty transportation workforce. we'll be working with our controllers office, we'll invite all our heeds from regional transportation system and our technology community to the table. i'm also thankful that commissioner wen eras agreed to meet with us on this opportunity. we'll maintain the condition of our streets and we'll make municipal transportation systems in this city work the way they want to work. don't get close to our municipal syst system that some folks may say. we cannot let politics be our guide. paris london and england has great transportation systems but look at san francisco. achieving a world class transportation system is a journey forw
the revenue coming to pay for taxes and things. while political things are hard to work out we've got to find a solution. >> commissioner moore. i have to assume if this legislation passes it will be welcome by many. i hope you have a more - have the american architects and civil engineers help you because this is relevant to how you use the ground floor and the useable of the ground space. so i hope i will be relying on those organizations to give their full support to our effort >> i actually have in front of me patio letter of support in addition to other letters from various groups around san francisco. i know this is the first time we've discussed this but that came out of the cap a report. so this is a 10 year process. this has been reached out to stakeholder. so we believe this is not about politics but public safety and it is overwhelmly supported by the supervisors you don't see in this day and age >> yeah, about 20 years ago before caps there was a safety program and there was a citizen committee to have loans but my understanding that program never materialized. >> what you're
these specimens saved. i go to a tax dermist shop when the man gives a look of hear when i pull out the ear shells. he refused to do it. i return it later and unmake his look say, i will never do it again your ear shells forgotten in the trash bin of the polytechnic where i toss them of history. days later i'm convinced i see one hand carried by a rat. seeking the traces of your body and the animals is this not a form of transcendence my darling. a downward rising the maggets small white gods like an animal mob. you did not answer my question with the language we used between us you vomited and stared into the lenses i wore to cover my pupils to keep some things in and some things out plastic screens. was it not possible to make love in that space. i could save you and i do make an essay and listened and obeyed. i hoped to carry your ear shell with me. i read the manual from beginning to end a manual for the master's and the slaves much the master hates the slave. not the [inaudible] we would like your spirit. it is what we seek in the dark pits of the capital. what else could be accomplished or d
clients are working poor. they pay their taxes. they may run into a rough patch now and then and what we're able to provide is a bridge towards getting them back on their feet. the center averages about 14,000 visits a year in the health clinic alone. one of the areas that we specialize in is family medicine, but the additional focus of that is is to provide care to women and children. women find out they're pregnant, we talk to them about the importance of getting good prenatal care which takes many visits. we initially will see them for their full physical to determine their base line health, and then enroll them in prenatal care which occurs over the next 9 months. group prenatal care is designed to give women the opportunity to bond during their pregnancy with other women that have similar due dates. our doctors here are family doctors. they are able to help these women deliver their babies at the hospital, at general hospital. we also have the wic program, which is a program that provides food vouchers for our families after they have their children, up to age 5 they are able to rec
was tax increases that effect the working poor primarily and the very affluent and not really not much of an impact on the middle class and you can may be have your own political opinions about that but the spending cuts didn't really take much effect at all. the spending cuts are now poised to go into effect march 1st and to make thing more interesting we run back into the ceiling debt much later and that rolls up into the fiscal cliff 2.0 in how the government tempts to deal with it. so you may ask yourself we have a portion of the tax increases went through and who knows exactly what congress is going to but it's probably a pretty good guess that we get to the very last minute right before the march 1st effective gate date for the spending cuts and then we get some other short-term extension to add to this made for tv drama that they seem so fond of lately and you wonder where does it get us long term and how are we able to close the gap here the congressional budget office has looked at what they consider to be the most likely outcome of the ongoing negotiations which, is a marsha
, they'll take it down and charge them on their taxes. so, that's i think a very key component to any ordinance that would be enacted in the city that you want to control the image making. this is not the art historian. this is like a civic administrator or urban planner. you want to control the image making that's going on in your city because it's about your city, right? so, it's a very important part of the program. >> interesting. anybody else? >> i totally agree with that. [speaker not understood] for years actually. >> the mic, have you stand up and you go next and we'll have you go. >> i totally agree with that. a lot of cities are very successful in california with having a mural ordinance or we have house of color for various parts of our city. my city unfortunately chose not to enact that. so, with the fact there are no ordinances against it, fall completely out of the purview of the police code enforcement to deal with it. and that's kind of what i was trying to get across when we were talking about permission if it doesn't violate a local ordinance or state ordinance or an
unique agency in that many respects it oversees the implementation of transportation and sales tax, so it's a very san francisco specific agency in that sense, and i think it's important to do a pretty comprehensive search, but i want to make sure that there's also a focus on the san francisco specific needs that we have including making sure that local internal candidates are part of the consideration because i do think that we're unique in many respects. >> i agree with that wholeheartedly. our outreach strategy is two fold. we always start with a focused area for a variety of reasons including economics. given the current economic conditions in the country lot of of relocation and family relationships and the others we try to start in this area and then build out from there, so although it's a national recruitment our first focus is local, then regional, then nationally. where that differs -- where we defer from that is when we don't have strong individuals in certain parts of the country. we went south carolina because we heard about somebody or to boston and someone that knows
public streets and public right of ways. we know very well that you have very high taxes and you have very high parking fees. could you talk about who and how you maintain your infrastructure and the streets? is that just a given, you decide to build something and somebody maintains it, or is there an agreement with another department to maintain it? >> the authorities in amsterdam, the infrastructure and transport department and municipalities, they financed it, they planned it, they build it, construct it, and they maintain it. i think that is the logical route. and is paid by the community's -- and is paid by the communit ies, and also from the state department. [inaudible] >> in the netherlands, if a road is really bad they will fix it. >> ok, there is a question in the back. >> our director of public works was in the back. he has a real problem here. maintenance is a huge bill. we do not have the wherewithal to maintain what we have. putting in new facilities increases the cost. then when you bring in different types of facilities -- >> we see a lot of the european- style traffic
primarily it's about planning and oversight and making sure that the tax dollars are being well spent so i want to encourage you to keep that very firmly in mind. this is a somewhat unique setting. >> i agree wholeheartedly. that's a good point, and it also speaks to commissioner mar's comments about outreach and inclusion in the stakeholder engagement process. if you look at the timeline today is march march 18. we have basically this week to do community engagement which means from the standpoint of scheduling and making it happen that's a very, very aggressive timeline in order to produce a document that you will have to review and approve on the following week, so what i might suggest that we might want to do as part of this process is have some of that community engagement be on-going. the fact that we have a recruitment profile that has been produced does not necessarily impede us from listening to our stakeholders and being able to integrate additional comments into the selection and evaluation part of the process which is equally important as identifying what the key characteri
that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want to connect through video. i want to share with you a few things that users are saying at telling us about their experience. 91% says that it helps them share information. that is the number one thing that people providing support to us want. 80% says that it strengthens connections. how can using something on-line actually make us feel closer or more connected to our friends and family? out it works, the more connected th
since 1980 and have been driving a tax i since 1984 i think that all of these people who are here have only one question. what is the beef? okay? after many years of driving a taxi cab in san francisco, i feel that i make less than minimum wage in san francisco. minimum wage in san francisco since 2000 has been 10 dollars per hour many taxi drivers are making less than 10 dollars an hour per hour when i started driving a taxi 1984 the number of taxi cabs in san francisco were only 650 right now the number is 1700 cabs. at the same time every single day there are twaen between 7 hundred and 9 hundred limos are operating illegally in san francisco and at the same time the population of san francisco since 1980 which was 735 thousand right now it has reached to 8 hundred thousand people okay? 650 taxi cabs in 1984 and in 2013735 taxi cabs. at the same time many buses are chartering from one place to another so the taxi driver at the most gets 2 to 3 rides every shift and we're not talking about the city that has a convention every single day. >> if anybody else cares to address the
$55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that is the tip of the iceberg in terms of planning provisions that make it hard to foster a knife in the city. we are no
in a city that is over-taxing the and running down. [applause] >> i do think that you can do a lot through talking to your city supervisor and working through that process. i am telling you, there are ways that began help you. alcohol is a local issue on this type of matter. what we are behind would you guys want to do, whenever that is. a lot of times we do not always have statutes that make that much sense. it is partly the ways that the laws have evolved and we are the ones who are stuck with enforcing them the way that they are. that does not necessarily mean that we think they are particularly good ideas, but we certainly want people to grow, prosper, and be saved. that can be achieved in all sorts of ways. we want to work with you on that. thank you. >> i was the founding president of the entertainment commission. i retired and went on to found the culture association, the first trade association statewide for night life, bar, and restaurant activities. i am here with a question that plagues a lot of these license holders, who desire to have their establishment opened for all age dan
the taxes. you're supposed to do the cleaning so i think you can tell from the emotion in my voice and the fact that we're here there is a problem here. you cannot have a few people that work for the city and maybe idealistic and want more trails. i hike all the time. you can't put in logs and gravel and say we're done. there needs to be comprehensive budgetary planning to consider what this is really going to cost whether it's worth it. maybe you should put toilets into the park at the top of the hill. there are no toilets. hundreds of people use bernal heights hill and no toilets. no toilets at glen canyon park. there are other priorities rather than making a trail down a steep piece of land that connects a child's play ground for an area used for dog walking. thank you. >> thank you. >> joshua. >> good morning commissioners. joshua [inaudible] with bright line defense. we're a nonprofit community organization that works to promote sustainability in low incomes of color. i want to speak about a particular issue -- i -- >> is this about the ? >> no. >> well, we're going
is looking for supervision, but again as you might imagine the resources are severely taxed. and during the budget difficulties in the last years, the ability to manage large numbers. we are talking for example, homeless individuals, we see 30 individuals at any one given time. that's the active case load and it's driven by that. >> i have a question from the public defender for the law enforcement officials here. what reforms can you commit to at this point to reduce pretrial detention population? shall we start with sheriff mirkarimi or the district attorney? >> i will reiterate that the strategy that i think san francisco should seriously consider legislate a new criteria. that's what the penal code has empowered us to do. we could start right away by corralling a number of legislators and city hall to get behind this effort completely. and i suggest budgetary wise pretrial as will represents is not funded enough. frankly. and our ability to i think really discharge in a supervised capacity so there is an alternative to incarceration is something that the city should put on a higher
this tax increase. i'm against the aluminum awe ning. we have a building near by. the pigeons love it and the dirt loves it. it will buildup and you just can't go in with a rag and wipe those out every 3 or 4 months. it's really impossible. to clean it, we water spray down and it's a big mess. i believe, no. 1. no. 2, the pigeons love it. they will find their way in and there is a lot of areas. big problems with pigeons. so i think we really need to rethink this. no. 3, i like the visibility and the idea of being able to see action and reducing 20 percent. you won't be as visible and being able to see it and as the dirt builds up in these circles, they are getting smaller and smaller and the visibility will get less and less. i don't think it's a good idea. i think mr. clark has some great ideas, but i don't think this is a good one and i think we should reject this idea and keep the glass. thank you. >> thank you, are there any other members who would like to speak on the this item? seeing none comment is closed on this item. we have an amended resolution. are there any comments
. we are already at 8 and 3/4 tax, i wouldn't be disappointed if it was raised. i was hoping it would we the be iconic structure that we saw in the original plans. the terrorist have won. security can be addressed. if the glass awe ning can be retained. let me point out about 15 years ago there were different proposals for the bay bridge which is opening later this year. and because certain politicians wanted a signature you are tower, that cost more. we are just talking about 17-and-a-half million. i think it's appropriate. >> thank you. i'm not used to the bell in this room. the first bell is to indicate that you have -- 10 seconds. okay. this is an indicator that you are coming up your near time when the final bell comes please finish your sentence. >> our next speaker? >> thank you. good morning, thank you for the opportunity. the first thing i would like to say, as you are going to hear next month we have more than to get the done. i they we should offer an alternate solution. this not only restricts -- it can be corrosive if it gets into contact with other metals especially wi
. a larger cost on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last
payroll tax was a job-killing effort here that we had to change it. what we went ahead and fixed and it and got it done and after the dishandling of the redevelopment towards find a lasting solution to fund affordable house and is did that with the creation of affordable housing fund 30 million-dollar a year for the next 30 years to build affordable housings and to insentive eyes builders to get more housing on their sites and and invite police and firefighters into an emergency responders commute in san francisco to hmm with the down payments of the first too time home buyers efforts we were asked to vest? our neighborhood park and is streets and we did just that with our million dollar general obligation bond to build and construct more open space most importantly, we put san franciscans back to work and we have a growing economy and we have invested in our city. so the year of 20 if we will, was about getting everything done. and when we did that, we were complimented by an unemployment rate that went in the last two years from 9.6% to as of december, 6.5% one of the lowes
with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mea
more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but being the easy political solution. >> i think we're out of time. i would like to thank everyone on the panel for their time.. >> thank you kindly. as an ex-felon, it's not my first effort with a public defender in public for a bunch of people who i know are working hard to make this substance abuse incarceration cognitive behavior thing work all together. i started doing my career in rehabs and jails and shelters and where i live. it's a privilege to work for people who chose to be the audience. oddly enough, they don't get that in the
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